nginx and the too many open files limit

So, nginx is fast, nginx is light, nginx is great but… nginx can be nasty too, with undocumented unexpected behaviors. What happened today? We were putting in production a new reverse proxy based on nginx 1.4.1 and one of the obvious thing you do when putting it in production is to raise the nofile limit from the standard 1024 (at least on Debian). So, you expect that nginx will inherit those pam_limit little numbers but… no!! If you check out /proc/$nginx_worker_PID/limits you will see that nofile is still 1024. So, obviously someone is cheating. Looking at the nginx documentation about nofile you will see that the interesting option worker_rlimit_nofile has no default value, so one would think that this value would be inherited from the system conf but, as you have already figured out, it’s not that way. You have to explicitly set, for example:

worker_rlimit_nofile = 100000;

in your main part of nginx.conf to have it as you wish. BTW this overrides limits.conf even if you put a lower value in limits.conf, so if you’re using nginx >= 1.4 just tune this configuration option to solve the “too many open files” problem.

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/etc/hosts and the thousand-characters-long line

This is a self-note in the case I encounter another strange behaviour like this. We were experiencing a strange problem with MySQL and DNS. I was trying to do this:

$ mysql -h server.mysql
Unknown MySQL server host 'server.mysql' (-1)

but both dig and a normal ping (which in turns uses libc and nsswitch to do the name resolving) were working:

$ dig +short server.mysql
192.168.10.1

$ ping server.mysql
PING server.mysql (192.168.10.1) 56(84) bytes of data.
64 bytes from server.mysql (192.168.10.1): icmp_req=1 ttl=64 time=0.399 ms

and obviously connecting using the MySQL client and the IP address worked. So, what was happening? The smarter amongst you maybe already know the problem: a very very large line in /etc/hosts was driving the mysql client crazy (but not ping). Removing the “files” database fron the hosts entry in /etc/nsswitch.conf showed where the problem lied, and fixing the bad-ass line fixed the problem

A handful of bash tips – part 1

During last weeks I’ve been doing lot of scripting (a user management system for our internal infrastructure which is formed by lots of services) and it ended being something like 3000 lines of bash code. Not too much but probably this is my greatest experience til now with bash :)

So, I’ve learnt a couple of things with this project and I’d like to share some tips and lessons learnt during the process. I’m not a bash guru, and if you find something could be improved, feel free to leave a comment.

Stand on the giant’s shoulders

You can find lot of docs on bash, like the Advanced Bash Scripting Guide, but these are better in my opinion

and the #bash IRC channel on irc.freenode.net. Just lurking the conversations will teach you lot of things

Use the latest and greatest bash version

This means right now to use Bash4. I mean, if you are using a shell to script things, use the latest version and take advantage of all its features! Really, I don’t care about portability, I script for my systems where I have full control. I’ve upgraded a Debian box from Lenny to Squeeze just to get bash4, go figure :) Obviously if you cannot update easily or you need to be portable, don’t fall in the bashisms trap, try to be as POSIX as possible and discard my tip(s).

Quote everything. I mean, really everything

If you are used to the simple $VARIABLE form, drop it right now and use always “${VARIABLE}”. It’s cleaner, it’s safer, it supports white spaces in the variable content etc.

Only the first quote matters

I’ve seen very often (and I was using this too) escaped quote chars when creating queries or strings to be passed somewhere. For example

QUERY="SELECT * FROM foo WHERE name=\"${VAR}\";"

because you fear that ${VAR} won’t be expanded if single quoted. But what really matters in this case is the first double quote. bash will interpret every other single quote before the closing double quote as a normal char, and pass it to the next hop. So this is perfectly right:

QUERY="SELECT * FROM foo WHERE name='${VAR}';"

${VAR} will be expanded as expected. This is quite useful if calling another script with parameters via ssh, and leave a cleaner syntax (I hate escaping chars)

ssh user@host "/path/to/script 'foobar goes first' 'second parameter'"

Use shift when receiving parameters

Probably you are already doing this, anyway it’s a lesson learnt in these days. If you’re are passing parameters to functions/other scripts instead of

PARAM1="${1}"
PARAM2="${2}"
# etc

use the power of shift. If you are going to change your mind about those parameters, you won’t need to rename everything.

PARAM1="${1}"
shift 1
PARAM2="${1}"
shift 1
# etc

Use input redirection instead of pipes when possible

A classic example

cat /path/to/mylst|while read foo
do
# do somtething with foo
done

should be

while read foo
# do something with foo
done < /path/to/mylist

why? because input redirection it is meant to do that!

ssh host completion in bash with a predifined user

If you use a lot ssh from your workstation to connect to many servers using the same user (for example, err… root, or a standard user present in every of your servers) as I do, this is a must-have :)

First of all, ensure you have

HashKnownHosts no

in your ssh_config.

Then, edit your .bashrc and append these lines:

complete -r ssh
_cssh ()
{
cur=${COMP_WORDS[COMP_CWORD]};
COMPREPLY=($(compgen -W "$(cat ${HOME}/.ssh/known_hosts |awk -F ',' '{print $1}')" -- ${cur##root@}))
}
complete -P "root@" -F _cssh ssh

you can change the root@ with your user@.

Enjoy!

pbzip2: parallel bzipping

Probably this software existed for a quite long time but I didn’t know its existence ’til now: pbzip2
it’s basically a bzip2 algorithm implementation with pthreads support. This mean, in a always more SMP world, that you can greatly improve your bzipping perfomances (divide the zipping time by the number of cores you have et voilĂ !)

Compression syntax is totally compatible:

$ pbzip2 big.file

while to unzip you have to do

$ pbzip2 -d big.file.bz2

Use with caution (or with -l and -p switches) cause you can easily saturate your 4xSix-cores monster.

HOWTO: Ethernet bonding in Debian Lenny

In an older post I explained how to create a bond interface in Debian Etch… now, this doesn’t work anymore due to some changes in Lenny.

So, long story short, first of all, install ifenslave

# apt-get install ifenslave-2.6

edit /etc/network/interfaces and add the bond0 config:

auto bond0
iface bond0 inet static
address 192.168.1.2
netmask 255.255.255.0
network 192.168.1.0
broadcast 192.168.1.255
gateway 192.168.1.1
# dns-* options are implemented by the resolvconf package, if installed
dns-nameservers 192.168.1.1
up /sbin/ifenslave bond0 eth0 eth1
down /sbin/ifenslave -d bond0 eth0 eth1

now edit /etc/modprobe.d/arch/x86_64 (change the filename depending on your architecture) and add these lines


alias bond0 bonding
options bonding mode=1 miimon=100 downdelay=200 updelay=200

Brief explanation:

  • miimon N: check if the active interface(s) is alive every N milliseconds
  • downdelay N: wait N milliseconds after a detected link failure to consider the link down
  • updelay N: wait N milliseconds after a detected link restoration to consider the link up
  • mode N: 1 means master/slave configuration, so there’s only one active master. If this link fails, then slave is used.

For a more complete description of all the possible parameters, refer to Linux Documentation/networking/bonding.txt

After this, you can restart networking or reboot if you are working remotely and it should work without a problem. It did for me :)